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of this great tabloid from england and you will see this is his common-law wife a and then "mississippi burning" because wait until you hear how scarpa senior saul's the "mississippi burning" case. scarpa sr. had various nicknames, the killing machine, he thought he had a license to kill and he would sign the notes killing machine they called him career reaper, the mad hatter, hannibal lector because he was stopped counting after 50 birder's that makes him the most prolific killer pardon to stop counting and makes the wood of the top serial killers of all time he only did 30 years -- 30 days out of 30 years in prison he was a topic for mint his memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. three separate crime organized strike force in chicago, a brooklyn tried to put him away in the justice department tried to get this mad killer of history and other members of the fbi who are protecting him to keep them on the street. these are couple of homicides in the upper left corner he shot him while he was stringing christmas tree lights with his wife at his house. nicky was sitting in his toyota whe
was not mentioned. even though in mississippi where i was working, only 3% of the black people were registered. 40% of the population and incidentally, because of our work and working with other people, mississippi had the largest number of elected officials, but now, we're here 50 years later and we find in washington that more than in 1953. more people out of work, but more importantly, we went free in 1963. we need state hood. state hood. >> better jobs, better pay was an objective in 1963. a long time before voting rights legislation would come about, but many are crediting the march to having to expedite that, so what are you hoping comes after this 50-year mark of this march? the march did sort of spur us on and lighten our spirit, but we went to work the next week in mississippi and alabama and georgia, et cetera, so what i hope this march will do is let us know the struggle is not over. there's still massive discrimination, unemployment, gaps between the white and black students and it would spur us on to stop being so complacent, but from my point in washington, state hood is my number on
. and then mississippi burning. wait until you hear hal scarpa senior is the gatt this of the mississippi burning portrayed in that movie which they happen. scarpa see at various nicknames. they call them the killing machine. he reveled in this. he felt that he had a license to kill. he would sign notes cayenne, killing machine. they called him the grim reaper, hannibal lector, the mad hatter. he had various names. he stopped counting after 50 murders, which makes him the most prolific killer in the history of cosa nostra, bar none and it makes him one of the top zero colors of all time, by the way. anyway, he only did 30 days in 30 years in prison. why? because from 1962 forward he was the top echelon criminal informants for the fbi. his briefing memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. over the years three separate organized crime strike forces, one in newark, one in chicago, one in brooklyn tried to put them away. could people are trying to get this mad dog killer of the street. other members of the fbi you are protecting him and keeping it on the street. these are a couple of the homic
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
a burn in mississippi. people are not being hung in mississippi any more. there's racism there, no doubt. there's racism in boston. when you went through those periods, i went through them in boston, i was amazed how much the white community were really outraged in boston. but let's keep in mind the tenor of the times you're born in. these kids today are not born at a time when there's racial tension. >> still, the leader of the senate. >> i understand that. >> president obama noted in his remarks when he made in the white house press briefing room at the end of the trayvon martin trial, or the george zimmerman trial, about the killing of trayvon martin, he said his daughters, sasha and malia don't talk this way. we learn from previous experiences. what i think is concerning is how exacerbated the administration makes these. partly because we pay attention to what they say, we're looking for any signal, we want the president to bring us together and it actually hasn't happened. maybe that's the fault of those who would oppose him on his policies. somehow i don't -- i actually can't get m
of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day the -- down in alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor have his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day down in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together. this is our hope. this is the faith that i go back to the south with. with this faith w
wife called 911. >> my has has been shot. >> mississippi stretched a mile -- what's your name? >> karla porter. >> do you know the person? >> no. i never seen him before before. he was black and he just came in the side door. i went out and he came in. >> police say her whole story is a lie. she master minded a plan to have her husband murdered. she even enlisted the help of several people, including her sister, brother and nephew to hire hit man walter bishop. >> bishop told police he was promised $9,000 by karla who only asked one question when it was over. >> she asked if he was dead. i said i guess. she okay. >> during a long interrogation with police karla porter broke down. during her tearful confession she claimed her husband mentally and physically abused her. >> i didn't want any of this to happen. i didn't. >> what happened, car karla? >> he was just being really mean. >> reporter: porter was the last of five conspirators to go to trial. the hitman was sentenced to life in prison. i'm mike schuh reporting live in towson. back to you. >> thank you. if porter is co
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> no. i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating carson patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl oldest rookie, 2 years old. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chilo infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a certain in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl. he was shot dead by an fbi tack day cal agent, and this morning, his victim, 16-year-old hannah anderson is to be reunited with her fathe
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
't rainfall amounts in the mid atlantic and parts of the lower mississippi valley and even to the plains. that includes oklahoma city. that cold front is going to bring a nice change out there. the cold air is dipping in from the north. that means temperatures for some parts are going to run-about 10 degrees below average. you will say, is ill really still august? temperatures in the 70s. yes. that's what we're expect, tuesday, wednesday, once that front passes, typically temperatures in throw 80s an parts of the south as well. >> it's good for the kids. the kids won't feel so bad about starting school now. >> yes, they will. i feel bad for them. >> come on! be excited about school, kids. >>> in the meantime if you look up in certain parts, you will see a meteor shower, tell us about that. >> these are images from last year. we're talking the peak viewing is tonight as well as tomorrow. these are the images and you're looking at the meteors and the debris. once that starts to hit the atmosphere, that's when you start to see it trailing and burning up. when they hit the earth they move at
. >> it depends in the context of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60 sglsh mississippi. >> not only that a student of my history. i said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word. i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people who i'm connected to, ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who have come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> well, we had a fascinating conversation. we'll have more on my interview tomorrow on "360." it opens tomorrow. >>> the custody battle over veronica may be near a breaking pointment the adopted parents are in oklahoma tonight trying to bring her home. the lawyers from both s
from lookout mountain, from every hill and molehill from mississippi. from every mountain side, let freedom ring, there is in the scope and grandeur and fragrance of those words the very picture of this land, and this remarkable man managed to raise up civil rights as american rights, as american as the land god gave us. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. \s. >>> i'm live tonight from washington, d.c. tonight's lead, a taste of their own medicine. president obama hit the road today with a message aimed at republicans he es had enough. >> we've seen a faction of republicans in congress that suggest that maybe america shouldn't pay its bills that have already been run up, that we should shut down government if they could shut down obama care. you know, that won't grow our economy, that won't cede jobs, that won't help our middle class. >>> he's right, we could afford it. what doesn't the gop understand? the law was passed, signed into law, upset by the supreme court, reaffirmed by the election. bron chanting. >> ge
mississippi. but when it was published in 61864 the country was at war with the south and then two years later appearing in to the title history of the plots and crime. >> to overthrow liberty people were still reeling from the assassination of abraham lincoln and that feels like a conspiracy movie in the '70s received respectful though this is a the your time san "chicago tribune" and the papers praised philadelphia philadelphia, harrisburg, and a pennsylvania even the democratic papered claimed it the most powerful book of the century. and then in them with the letters to warn him all and then one issa this since this started 2.0 he said you be careful of this food you eat and drink can what you take and it was also said to lincoln i have heard it was the undoubted fact that the last two weeks general's harrison and taylor came to their end of what was administered in their plates at the white house. after lincoln died two prominent ministers of detroit in connecticut it were the supposes murders of harrison and taylor and other alleged their assassination for the new york ledger but added s
white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. thank you for watching. "hardball" starts right now. >>> a question of character. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? r
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
-old emmitt till was murdered by two white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now.
discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes. no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating cancer patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this case this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie, he's 28 years old, and after serving times for a crime he did not commit. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, his attitude is great. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chillow infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a search in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl
was out in iowa which was across the mississippi river from galena and did this time exposure of star trails across the sky but he also captured one of the need years. if you look carefully you will see a line and that's one of the meteors shooting across the sky above this beautiful church out there in iowa. thanks to loraine for a gorgeous shot. check this out. did you see these on sunday out anywhere across the area. dan captured these lenticular clout. they look like flying saucers and you don't often see those but that's a sign of a wave pattern in the atmosphere. michael was out on the schooner read which shooting the tall ships on saturday night. a beautiful shot right there. robert earl was out in north carolina outer batanks, how would you like that coming at you been on a boat somewhere? job was downstate and captured shell clouds just a couple weeks ago, down by lichfield illinois is a we've had our fair share of shell clouds. it is beautiful sunset from jeffrey. jeffrey has the city skyline framed against a beautiful setting sun. we have some talented photographers o
first discovered the following places: florida, the pacific ocean and the mississippi river? do those come to the top -- would you know, jon? jon: two of those, i know. jenna: oh, please. jon, of course. if you're like the rest of us -- [laughter] don't feel bad if you're stumped without using the internet. so were we, quite frankly, and to make it worse, these questions are from a test administered to kentucky schools in 1912 to eighth graders. eighth graders. david strange is the executive director of the bullet county history museum located in shepherdsville, kentucky, and the only thing that made me feel sort of okay is knowing that you, the smart guy at the museum, also had to turn to the internet -- [laughter] to find out some of these answers. how difficult was it? >> well, i remember, i actually remember most all of these questions or similar to them being taught and asked when i was in high school -- jenna: oh, come on, you weren't around in 1912, david, please. [laughter] >> no, but when i was in high school, in the '60s and '70s, i remember being taught them. now, rememberi
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
, minnesota, minnesota, georgia, florida. i point out mississippi, minnesota, georgia, and florida. we know the stereotypes that probably are quite true when you look at the food culture of some of those southern states. >> the southeast does struggle. i come from a long line of obesity. i think the real message is it doesn't matter where you live. it doesn't matter if your mother, grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, in my case, they're all obese. that doesn't mean i have to be obese. we're seeing a transition. >> so preschool the study was followed preschoolers. that is such a smart move. that's where it has to happen. >> i want to read the first lady's response to the numbers. she says today's announcement reaffirms my belief that together we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life. i see it as a balance of kids. you can play the video games but you can go on your bike. >>> i know it's not always easy to nurse. it was tricky. i had a lifestyle that made it doable for me. so i hope that i'm so glad to see more women nursing. i'm so glad
is violence. >> keenan leaks of jackson, mississippi, once thought it was impossible for black students to be falling so short in education. >> ask the kids in my neighbor hood and the parents and coming to find out there was a 70% dropout rate in the neighborhood. parents want a choice. even poor parents want a choice. why should only rich children have a choice? >> the work is being applauded not only by parents, students and businesses but also politicians and gospel recording artist marvin sapp. >> when we see how we are using our young children at an alarming rate, i believe that somebody needs to step to the plate. you know what, i take that challenge of trying to bring about change. >> i'm a doctor, phd, coming out of a housing project in milwaukee, wisconsin. the only thing that got me to the point you and i are having this interview is an education. >> power of an education for dr. howard fuller is the power of faith. he acknowledges there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. >> getting message out. one of the best ways i have ever heard. thank you. >>> president obama
to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like >> good morning.g y.ppy monda the sun breaking out with spotty showers possible. >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while the name sake of amelia earhart recreating her flight has explaining to do this morning. >> tracy morgan will give us a tour of his shark themed man cave. it's outrageous. first, these messages. to help pay for the road trip... before they earned 1% back on all purchases -- everywhere, every time -- and 2% back at the grocery store... even before earning 3% back on gas, w
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
's go down to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like this mor >>> thanks, bill. 8:07 now. taking a live look at the golden gate bridge, what you can make out here. i can tell you right now the low clouds are going to be with us for most of the daylplp in san francisco, but you will get gel a couple of bits ofÑi sunshine. most comfortable conditions right around the innerq xdbay. 75 for instance in oakland. then the heshu is on as we head through tomorrow climbing by 90s return wednesday. upper 90ed by >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while
we're looking at some heat in texas on into the mid-mississippi river valley. 90s in interior sections of the southwest. some showers making their way from northeast new england on into the ohio valley. monsoonal moisture into the >>> 8:08 only a thursday morning. good morning, i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are warming up nicely. we are at 64 right now in sunnyvale. 61, san jose, 61 to kick off the day in livermore. as we take you through the hour by hour changes, about 77 in livermore, 65 in oakland. so, running about three to five degrees cooler this afternoon. also, you will probably notice less humidity out there, so it feels more true to the temperatures that we are accustomed to here in the bay area this time of year. hold onto those norms as we get into the upcoming weekend. >> and that's your latest weather. matt? >> all right. al, thanks so much. more new of our exclusive conversation with california kidnapping survivor hannah anderson as she speaks out for first time. nbc's national correspondent kate snow is out in san diego. good morning again. >>
in damage. changing that area of louisiana, mississippi, alabama, the gulf coast, forever. and you juxtapose that with the fact this has been a quiet hurricane season. as a matter of fact, the last time we were hurricane-free in august was 2002. hurricane gustav on september 11, 2002. why is it quiet? as the systems come off the african coast they hit drier stabler air and die out. we don't see any change coming but out west they have been active. moisture is going to make its way into the southwest so over the weekend look for from 1 to 2 inches of rain from southern california into the southwest. there may be some flash flooding. we're going to get to your local forecast in the next 30 seconds. r who's secretly serving steaks from walmart. it's a steak over! dude, it's so good. it's juicy. it's nice and tender. only one in five steaks is good enough to be called walmart choice premium steak. all these steaks are from walmart. oh my gosh! top ten most tender steaks i've had. i'm going to start buying meat at walmart. walmart's prices are so low you could have steak at every game. it's 100%
mississippi for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate your interest in my airports but what i want to do is make sure we keep it in the right language. my only -- sensitive personal. it is i do with time and attend a wedding like that in the private sector. it's sensitive security information. and that kind of information, we all agree, is something that is far more serious than someone not showing up for work. now, as important for me in this conversation is whether or not, mr. halinski, you saw the fact that in the contracting with tsa with private contractors, because you do not have the ability to deal with personnel found guilty of that. have you now change the contracting document to tsa to get you to where you need to be? >> yes, sir. we have changed the contract for all the contracts were spp airports, and there is a clause in there that requires them to report any type of misconduct activities of the workforce. and we also require in this new language that if an employee is identified with misconduct, that appropriate action needs to be taken by that company, sir stev
the mississippi river. flash flooding for some of the heavier downpours we're seeing right now. it's a lot about temperatures too, 73 for a high in chicago where the normal high is 83 degrees. we're well into the 100s in parts of texas that will stay the case tomorrow and it'll stay pretty chilly in chicago, 74 degrees with some late day thunderstorms but in the northeast we are starting off a stretch of low humidity, temperatures right around 80 degrees so some areas lucking out with the weather. >> okay, for which we thank you very much, dylan dreyer. >> no one landed the prize in the powerball drawing. it's going to a whopping $400 million. and in today's number ones, the states that spend top dollar on lottery tickets. massachusetts leads the way according to a study last year, average spending, 860 bucks a year per person. georgia second with spending $470. $20 less than third place new york and also beer, let's talk about that coming out on top in a new gallup survey as america's favorite alcoholic beverage. 36% prefer beer. 35% prefer wine and 23% go for hard liquor. >> i told you i didn'
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